Money School

2017 Innovation Award

Recipient of the 2017 Innovation Award from the Massachusetts Office of Victim Assistance!

WHAT IS MONEY SCHOOL?

Build toward the financial future that you want!

Money School is an award-winning trauma-informed financial independence initiative designed to create long-term safety and economic security for survivors of domestic or sexual violence.

We believe the economic system makes it hard for people to get ahead, and we focus on giving you the skills, tricks, and tangible resources to move forward.

We don’t tell you what to do or blame you for your situation.  We don’t focus on budgeting or ask you to save money you don’t have.

“When I came to the Elizabeth Freeman Center, I was a woman who didn’t know who I was anymore.  I didn’t know what to live for, how to trust, I didn’t have a purpose.  Through the Money School Program, I now have a full-time job, I am now enrolled at [community college], and I now get up every day of my life knowing that I can make a difference.”   -Money School graduate

 

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE?

Money School is for anyone who has experienced domestic or sexual violence.

Money School series (in English) are currently offered in Pittsfield, North Adams, and Great Barrington.  Escuela de Finanzas para los hispanohablantes se ofrece en Pittsfield (Money School for Spanish-speakers is currently offered in Pittsfield).

Participants receive dinner, childcare, and a cash stipend at each of the five workshops.

To learn more, contact Donna L., our Money School Facilitator, at (413) 499-2425 x613 or DonnaL@elizabethfreemancenter.org.

 

“It helped me see I was not alone. I acquired a network of assistance for my needs. This has been an amazing experience and life-changing. Very helpful.”   -Money School graduate

 

WHY IS IT NEEDED?

Domestic violence and sexual assault are a primary cause of poverty in our state and our country.

These types of violence can have long-term financial impact on survivors’ lives.  And the costs – of rebuilding after trauma, of economic abuse, of job loss or interruption, of having to move and losing community supports – can put survivors in the position of making impossible choices (like between safety and basic needs) or make it hard to escape trauma and violence.

Money School helps survivors achieve and maintain safety, economic independence, and family well-being for themselves and their children.

 

“I’ve received more information than I thought possible to help me move forward, and I have a clearer picture.”   – Money School graduate

 

WHO IS INVOLVED?

Money School is run by Elizabeth Freeman Center (EFC), and was developed in a partnership between EFC and the American Institute for Economic Research.

We would like to thank Money School’s ever-growing class of participants and graduates for continually reshaping the program with their insight and experience, the Economic Security Task Force of the Massachusetts Rural Domestic and Sexual Violence Project of the Department of Public Health for its valuable feedback and assistance, and our community of Money School presenters, coaches, volunteers, donors, and champions for their tremendous support.

With special thanks to the Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts, Guardian Life Insurance, Greylock Federal Credit Union, Berkshire Bank Foundation, MountainOne, NBT Bank, and the TD Charitable Foundation for their support.